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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 28, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello. it's thursday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme we must continue to deal with our debts. that's the message from theresa may this morning. she's due to speak shortly at the bank of england. you used to hear politicians being lambasted by their critics were all sounding the same. you don't hear that now. yesterday, pride in socialism from jeremy corbyn and today pride in the free market from the prime minister. we will bring you theresa may's speech live from 9:30am. and has sexual harassment become depressingly normal part of a night out for many young people?” have also had people trying to stick their hands up my skirt and grab my breasts. it is just not nice. but it has become something casual that gets thrown about all the time these days. we will have the full report and ask why it is apparently the norm. plus video footage has emerged
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that allegedly shows england cricketer ben stokes in a violent fight outside a nightclub. we will bring you the details. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. we are every weekday. we want to hear from you this morning if you've had unwelcome sexual attention on a night out. let us know what happened and how you dealt with it. and how did the menu deal with it as well? —— venue. also this morning, ryanair is threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights when their flights are cancelled. if you've been affected, will you ever use the airline again? we will talk about that after ten o'clock. do let me know. use the hashtag victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today: the prime minister is to mount a strong defence of the free market economy, a day afterjeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a crisis of legitimacy.
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theresa may will put forward her arguments in a speech marking the 20th anniversary of the independence of the bank of england. chris mason is at westminster. what is she likely to say? good morning. this is politics in primary colours. over the last 20 years we have been so over the last 20 years we have been so used to politicians arguing over the micro—details, triangulating policies. none of that now. we had jeremy corbyn talking about rent—controlled and nationalising the water industry yesterday. and today the prime minister is talking about the free market economy under collective rules and regulations is the greatest mark of human progress ever created. she will say it is unquestionably the best and only sustainable means of increasing the living standards of everyone in the country. she will say that the conservative approach is a balanced one in contrast with what she sees as the unfunded borrowing and
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significant higher levels of taxation under labour. this is the beginning of the theme that the conservatives will roll out at their party conference starting in manchester in a couple of days. the prime minister will be well aware that there was that buoyant and upbeat mood as labour's gathering in brighton. i don't think it will be the same in manchester. the conservatives very much winded after their election setback of a couple of months ago. thank you very much, chris mason. we will bring you theresa may's speech live just after 9:30am. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. rya nair has been threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched enforcement action against europe's biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption. it's the first step towards court action. sarah corker reports. it has been a turbulent few weeks for europe's biggest airline. ryanair blames its cancellation
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chaos on messing up pilot holiday rosters. but the civil aviation authority has accused the no—frills carrier of persistently misleading passengers. it said ryanair was wrong to claim it did not have to re—route customers on rival airlines. the warning came as more disruption was announced yesterday. and this second raft of cancellations will affect 18,000 flights between november and march, disrupting another 400,000 passengers. the airline says it will fly 25 fewer planes to cut the risk of further cancellations. and more than 30 routes will be suspended, including popular tourist routes like london stansted to edinburgh and glasgow. and earlier this month the airline cancelled up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. it has now also dropped its plan to buy the italian carrier alitalia. the company insists it has no pilot shortage. passengers are being offered a full
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refund and vouchers of up to 80 euros, while ryanair could end up in court. sarah corker, bbc news. the body that was responsible for managing grenfell tower has been stripped of its contract to run social housing for kensington and chelsea council. the decision was taken unanimously at a special meeting of the council last night. before the vote, residents criticised the council's track record of rehousing survivors. 20 families affected by the fire are now in permanent accommodation and a further 50 to have accepted offers in principle. —— 52. police are calling for children in schools to be taught what to do in the event of a uk terror attack, and are also warning eyewitnesses to flee the scene, rather than trying to film atrocities on mobile phones. the call follows a number of attacks in the uk this year, including the manchester arena bombing, which targeted people at a pop concert.
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andy moore reports. i've trained in taekwondo for 16 years. the new video, aimed specifically at young people, features some famous faces, with a message that police hope is becoming familiar to the british public. do you know what i'd do in a knife or gun terror attack? i'd run. hide. tell. this campaign has been launched against a backdrop of a wave of terror attacks, including the manchester arena bomb, where many young people were killed and injured. their message is to run if you can, hide if you can't, and then tell police about the threat as soon as it is safe to do so. after the parsons green attack on the tube in london, some people stopped to film a partially exploded device that was still on fire. police are taking this opportunity to remind everyone that their first priority is their own safety. they should move rapidly away from any danger. hello, you're through to the nspcc hotline. the nspcc is also involved in this campaign. they have been contacted by 300 young people worried about terrorism since april.
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police are hoping this new message will be taught in schools and colleges to all 11 to 16—year—olds. remember, run. hide. tell. andy moore, bbc news. united nations aid officials are being allowed to visit rakhine state in myanmar today, for the first time since the massive exodus of rohingya muslims began a month ago. the un has accused the burmese military of ethnic cleansing, and their humanitarian agencies pulled out when the security forces began a military operation there at the end of august. the children's charity unicef uk says orphaned refugee children with relatives in britain should to be able to come here to live with their families. it says bringing them directly to the uk would make them less likely to set out on perilous journeys to other parts of europe, and would stop them being exploited by criminal gangs. the home office said its approach
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was to resettle whole families. scientists in china say they have performed precise chemical surgery on human embryos for the first time, opening up the prospect of preventing inherited diseases. their research focused on embryos which contain the blood disorder beta—thalassemia. using a technique called base editing, they were able to remove a mutation in the dna code which produces the disorder. hugh hefner, who founded playboy magazine, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises said he passed away peacefully at home from natural causes. simonjones looks back at his life. he was the man who vowed never to grow up. credited with ushering in the 1960s sexual revolution, bunny girls, nightclubs, a corporatejet called big bunny, all made possible by playboy magazine. its first issue featured marilyn monroe as its centrefold. it was an instant hit. by the 1970s, 7 million people
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a month were buying playboy. mr hefner, i suppose you are the world's most famous hedonist. certainly ina certainly in a public way. are you a happy man? oh, yes — never more happy than now. he lived the lifestyle portrayed in the magazine. he was attacked by feminists, accused of reducing women to sexual objects. as magazine sales eventually dwindled, he retired to his playboy mansion where the partying continued. at the age of 86, he married his third wife, crystal harris, playboy playmate, 60 yea rs crystal harris, playboy playmate, 60 years hisjunior. he fascinated, shocked and entertained in equal measure. he died at the playboy mansion, in los angeles, surrounded by friends. his son said he defined the lifestyle and ethos at the heart of the playboy brand. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30.
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ryanair could be rya nair could be prosecuted ryanair could be prosecuted for misleading passengers because michael o'leary said the other week that there would be no more cancellations which has not turned out to be the case. there were many more cancellations over the winter months. if you have recently got an emailfrom them saying months. if you have recently got an email from them saying your flight has been cancelled, please let me know. louise says that over the yea rs know. louise says that over the years that she has used ryanair, when something goes wrong, is a cancellation or long delay, ryanair have not been helpful. she has been left at an airport with no cash, no transport, no flight and no hotel. she hopes the caa take them to task. now the sport. this video has emerged allegedly showing ben stokes punching a man in the street. we have not been able to verify it and we are not showing the moving images at the minute because they aren't very ugly. they certainly are. good morning. the england all—rounder ben stokes is currently under investigation are causing actual
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bodily harm after being arrested in the very early hours of monday morning. we have been reporting this for the last 48 hours. it was in bristol where england had been playing. he was involved in an incident outside a nightclub. we are not showing the video because as you say, the video which was acquired by the sun newspaper, one minute long, is pretty graphic and we can't verify it either. these are some of the stills from it. it shows a man very closely resembling ben stokes involved in a brawl. he seems to repeatedly threw punches in that video towards a couple of men. one of them end up lying on the ground. we know that one man in the early hours needed to go to hospital for treatment with facial injuries. ben stokes also suffered a minor fracture to a bone in his hand on the night of the incident. his representatives have not said anything but the england and wales cricket board have given a brief statement when that to light late last night. they said: we have seen
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the footage for the first time tonight. there is an ongoing police investigation that will look at all available evidence. we do have to respect that process. ben stokes was named in the ashes squad yesterday as well, as everyone knows. on the field, some good news for england. he retained the vice captaincy as well when the ashes team was announced. he was left out of the match at the oval against the west indies and the fourth 1—dayer. and they won it to clinch the one day series and alex hales was also left out because he is helping police with their inquiries. he was with ben stokes on that morning in bristol. they won by six runs under the duckworth—lewis stern method. i wait explain it because smoke. coming out of my ears! moeen ali made a quickfire 48 to get england just over the line. they we re england just over the line. they were chasing 357, 358 to win. moeen
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ali had done enough to give england the win. they reached 268—5 and they are 3—0 up with one to play. moeen ali's middle order runs could be invaluable if ben stokes misses some of the ashes. let's hear from the england one day captain now about ben stokes being not part of their plans at the moment. it has never been an area of concern in the past. we have always believed it ourselves. —— we have always policed it ourselves. we need to look after each other as a team and it is not a case of individuals going their separate ways. we need to stick together. we need to put something in place where that doesn't leave us ina in place where that doesn't leave us in a position where we are at the moment. no ben stokes. he is unlikely to be involved in the final one day because of the broken bone in his hand. that will be in
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southampton. england will see if they can win that as well. a good week for the football teams in the champions league in britain. apart from the slip—up in moscow on tuesday night, the other five british teams in the champions league all won. a brilliant night for champions chelsea. they were against atletico madrid and they went behind. but alvaro morata equalised and then michy batshuayi got the winnerfor equalised and then michy batshuayi got the winner for chelsea in injury time. remember diego costa? frozen out by the blues? in the stands. he rejoined atletico madrid and he wasn't happy but the chelsea manager certainly was. he certainly thought they deserved it. we deserved to win. we continued to play with a good personality. we kept our heads oi'i good personality. we kept our heads on the pitch. in every moment of the game. yes, we deserved to win against a really good team like atletico madrid. brilliant night for chelsea. same for celtic in
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brussels. they started their campaign getting absolutely thumped by paris st germain in glasgow. but they beat anderlecht 3—0 last night and scott sinclair of the goals. it gives them a glimmer of hope of getting out of that group but it is bayern munich next back—to—back for brendan rodgers's team. manchester united still going like an absolute train in moscow. they beat cska 4—1. a couple of goals from romelu lukaku, a couple of goals from romelu lu ka ku, who else? a couple of goals from romelu lukaku, who else? they are top of the group as well with two out of two. this tonight is europa league night and arsenal and everton play this evening. thank you. campaigners are warning alcohol—related sexual harassment has become a normal part of a night out — with two thirds of women and one in four men saying they've been affected. the figures from charity drinkaware will come as no surprise to many young people who regularly have to endure unwanted comments and touching, especially in crowded places like clubs and concert venues.
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so what can be done to tackle the problem? this tweet from harry, i do not know if that is a man or a woman, it is spelt with a i at the end. they have gone home early because of groping. so what can be done to tackle the problem? newsbeat‘s lindsay brown has this report. my older sisters are both 30 with kids... anna and sunni say they get groped almost every time they go out. i've had people try to grope me while i'm at the bar which is a very common thing, especially when it's a very crowded bar. i've also had people try to stick their hands up my skirt and people try to grab my boobs. it's just not nice, but that has become something that's, like, casual and something that gets thrown about all the time these days. i'm quite a confident person, so i'm not afraid to stand up for myself and tell the boy or the girl or whoever‘s done it that they are in the wrong and this is why they are in the wrong. so when you are going out
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for a night, do you ever think about what clothes you are wearing in relation to where you are going and your previous experiences? i will choose something for the style, but my next thought will be, do i need to wear tights or shorts underneath this piece of clothing, so i have a layer of protection? or should i wear something different entirely? and when you say a layer of protection, what do you mean by that? i mean cycling shorts. that's my go to, i would say. i have about five pairs that i use. cycling shorts would mean that it's a lot harderfor a boy to get his hands up my skirt which is horribly graphic but it has happened on several occasions. do you ever worry about what you're wearing in terms of groping, sexual harassment in clubs? yeah, definitely. i mean, it varies where you are going. some places are a lot worse just because... i don't want to say it attracts different types, but it attracts a certain mindset,
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i think. so if people are there to pull, i think you are more likely to get groped. whereas somewhere people are going genuinely just for the dance, you could spend the whole night and not even brush past a boy. it's great. we are quite a strong group of girls, i think. before, when it's happened to me, my biggest worry has been, if this happens to someone else who isjust going to accept it... i think a lot of people mightjust take it because they don't really have the confidence to fight back or they think it's normal. who cares what sort of club it is? you should feel comfortable... sunni and anna are not alone. a new poll by drink aware found more than three quarters of the women they spoke to said they expected inappropriate comments or touching on a night out. almost two thirds of them had experienced sexual harassment. we are at thekla, it's possibly our favourite night out, we're definitely going to be seeing
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some more mates in there, having a bit of a boogie on the dance floor and i can't wait to get in. and two—for—one tequila, obviously. two—for—one drinks all night, so it is definitely a student haven. and it is notjust women. a quarter of men said they had been groped in clubs and bars. a bit of a weird experience. i was slightly drunk, this girl was slightly drunk, she kind of came on to me and she tried to grab my balls and i was like, 0k... so then i was a bit like, 0k, bit weird. i am not a fan of this. sexual harassment is a crime, but it is hoped that by getting friends to intervene when they see it will help change behaviour and attitudes. this club trains its staff to stop groping, but on busy nights, it can still go unnoticed. having an amazing time, but having said that, it only took about 30 minutes for me to be dancing and someone to reach behind my hair, grab it and yank it back. thatjust kind of already puts
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a downer on the night unfortunately. i am sure it will pick up, but i have got some friends who did just tell me that as we were filming, some people were walking through the crowd and they slapped some girls' bottoms and it's just not ok. sexual harassment and groping is becoming so normalised in bars and clubs across the country that campaigners now want people who see their friends being groped or harassed on a night out to step in and essentially take responsibility for it and put an end to it. this ad which is being shown in cinemas forms part of drink aware's campaign to make more people aware of the problem of groping in clubs. venues across the country are taking responsibility too. they are training staff in how to help victims and how to deal with the perpetrators. bristol university union is one of those who have signed up
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to the good night out scheme. there is only so much that you as an attendee can do. having people that are there and see these things night after night, they develop an eye for it and i think that is really important that they are there to make sure everyone is safe. they focus a lot on sexual consent which i think is really important, especially with people knowing how to deal with each other, knowing what is right and wrong, and it is notjust about sexual relations, relationships, it's about how you deal with people in everyday life, in clubs and in bars. these sorts of schemes are voluntary and many venues are yet to have any sort of policy in place to protect their customers and deal with those who commit the offence. let me know your own experiences. lindsay brown with that report. here with us now is lucy harrison. she has been groped multiple
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times on nights out. we also have journalist sirin kale from online news site broadly, who has been harassed so often she started writing about it. and jen calleja, she is a volunteer for good night out, which is an initiative aimed at helping the night—time economy tackle and prevent harassment. welcome to all of you, thank you for coming on the programme. what have you experienced? it tends to be someone getting closer, they will go for a someone getting closer, they will go fora grab, grab someone getting closer, they will go for a grab, grab your bum, someone getting closer, they will go for a grab, grab your burn, that kind of thing. it is intimidating. is it? why? it feels like somebody is saying that their night is more important than yours, they can control what happens to you during an evening. you are nodding in agreement, is that what it is about? yes, in all of those i've interviewed professionally in my experience. there have been so many times where i have been out and someone has grabbed me or touched me or my friend. after a while you shrug it off, that isn't right. you
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shouldn't be doing that. is it normal, though? it has become very normalised. why is that? because our culture sees it as part of a night out. it is just something that we recognise as part of going out. it doesn't have to be. that is where yourcampaign doesn't have to be. that is where your campaign comes in. as we saw on that film, it is ok to step in. it is ok to say something on behalf of your friend is ok to say something on behalf of yourfriend or even a complete stranger if you see them being hassled. absolutely, we are really pushing that people see this as something society, as a whole, should feel responsible for. we never advocate that people put themselves in danger and step into a situation that could turn violent or could escalate. if you see someone in trouble, check in with the person being harassed, you can even pretend that you know that person and say "i've got you a drink, want to go
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and get it?" and get them out the situation. if bar staff see something as they walk past, you can give a thumbs up or get eye contact with someone so they have gotten out. and as it always related to alcohol? would someone pinch someone's backside if they were sober? i've never had it with someone who is sober. just in general. you get groped on the tube as well. perhaps alcohol may make it more common, but i think that sexual harassment takes place in every aspect of our lives and our commutes, to the dance floors. and is their responsibility on the venues? they do not need to have their staff trained in this matter. as we were shown in the video, it isn't part of licensing. they then you might have a procedure to follow if someone is being violent but not necessarily what to do if someone is being harassed or groped. but because venues have to invite us
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into their space, we don't offer ourselves up to them, they come to us. ourselves up to them, they come to us. then use want and need this training. we have trained over 200 venues training. we have trained over 200 venues in the uk. to do what? we train all members of staff in a venue as to what to do if someone tells you they have been harassed or assaulted. those first few moments can limit trauma and promote belief to react in an empathetic way. we give a one—hour workshop to every memberof give a one—hour workshop to every member of staff that can be visible ona member of staff that can be visible on a night out, notjust all member of staff that can be visible on a night out, not just all staff that the people picking up the glasses, the person in the cloakroom, everybody. and what should happen to the person doing the harassing? it is very much what the harassing? it is very much what the victim wants. we wouldn't say that you automatically should do anything, we promote a zero tolerance policy. some venues might have a three strikes and you are out policy, whereas others have two or more people, they should not be harassed or grapesjust more people, they should not be harassed or grapes just because more people, they should not be harassed or grapesjust because the perpetrator should be given another
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chance. we say that whatever the victim wants to happen, if they want that person removed they should be. if the victim wants to let people know that there is someone behaving inappropriately, that does not want anything more to happen. inappropriately, that does not want anything more to happenm inappropriately, that does not want anything more to happen. it has to be victim lead. you were harassed and assaulted. can i ask about the language, groping, sexual harassment, sexual assault, what is it? it is sexual harassment, sexual assault. groping can minimise the language in a way. maybe we should call a spade a spade. it happen to you on one occasion and the person who did it was thrown out by let back into the venue. that caused some problems? yes, i felt like i had a responsibility to report it to the bouncer to protect other women. when we reported him to the bouncer, he was taken out and then allowed back end which was the worst possible outcome because he was extremely angry and became
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threatening to us. he really intimidated us a lot. he said nasty things to us about how we were not pretty enough to harassed. when we complain to the bouncer again, he basically accused us of lying. he told us that we were making it up and eventually he said, what do you expect if you go to a club? it's what happens. it's more distressing than the actual incident itself. lucy says as a female nightclub supervisor, she hopes that the women complain when it happens. there's no point in going on television if it is not reported when it happens, we cannot take action if people do not tell us. sarah says it happens all the time in the 90s, it isn't new but it was unreported at the time. you feel that, that it has been going on a long time. yes, it is one of those things where i know with the drinkaware of those things where i know with the drinkawa re groups of those things where i know with the drinkaware groups say that people almost expected on a night
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out, it is sad. they need to address reporting to the bouncers and door staff. you don't always know whether you are going to get a bouncer who is sympathetic to it or one who is going on the side of keeping the night going and not causing a fuss because it is easier to deal with one small person in front of you rather than wade into the crowd rather than wade into the crowd rather than wade into the crowd rather than find the person causing the problem. and it happens to men. the research made it clear. so women are groping men? or men are groping men? it is opportunity groping. it tends to be on hen parties and things like that. people have said to me that women go out, wearing these pink feathered things, groups for hen parties, that is when groping can happen too. ok. thank you all for coming in. we know that you all for coming in. we know that you will get in touch with your own experiences. in an hour's time we'll be speaking to alan d miller — chairman of the night time
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industries association, who represents clubs and bars. we will ask about responsibility when it comes to this kind of harassment. theresa may is due to speak live shortly. she will talk about the uk having to continue to deal with its debt. we will bring you that speech as soon as she starts talking. and calls from a leading children's charity for orphaned refugee children to be brought directly to this country so that they can be reunited with relatives. time for the latest news. here's annita. these are the bbc news headlines. ryanair has these are the bbc news headlines. rya nair has been these are the bbc news headlines. ryanair has been threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it launched enforcement action against your‘s biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption. it is the first step towards court action.
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ryanairsaid it first step towards court action. ryanair said it was confident there would be no more cancellations. theresa may is to mount a strong defence of the free market economy — a day afterjeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a "crisis of legitimacy". the prime minister will put forward her arguments in a speech to mark the 20th anniversary of the independence of the bank of england. she'll say a free market economy is the best and only sustainable means of increasing living standards for all. the body that was responsible for managing grenfell tower has been stripped of its contract to run social housing for kensington and chelsea council. the decision was taken unanimously at a special meeting of the council last night. before the vote, residents criticised the council's track record of rehousing survivors. 20 families affected by the fire are now in permanent accommodation and a further 52 have accepted offers in principle. police are calling for children in schools to be taught what to do
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in the event of a uk terror attack, and are also warning eyewitnesses to flee the scene, rather than trying to film atrocities on mobile phones. it comes after images of the bomb in parsons green were posted online within minutes. hugh hefner, who founded playboy magazine, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises said he passed away peacefully at home from natural causes. hugh hefner began publishing playboy from his kitchen in 1953 and it went on to be the biggest selling mends magazine in the world selling 7 million copies at its peak. his son cooper said he would be greatly missed by many. that is a summary of the latest bbc news. and now the sport headlines. the video has emerged allegedly showing the fight between the england all—rounder ben stokes that led to
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his arrest and accusations of actual bodily harm. he retains the vice captaincy with england. they won without him at the oval with a quickfire 49 runs from moeen ali seeing them getting over the line just. they won and the duckworth—lewis stern method in the over before they were forced. great night in the champions league. celtic, manchester united and chelsea all won. michy batshuayi won chelsea's winner over atletico madrid in spain. 2—1 to the blues. i will be back with an update at ten o'clock. let's talk a bit more about that video which has emerged of ben stokes allegedly punching a man in the street in bristol. we have not been able to verify the footage. it is published by the sun. it is a bit
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violent and you might not want children to see it. we are going to talk to michael vaughan and get his reaction right now, i think. no, talk to michael vaughan and get his reaction right now, ithink. no, i do apologise. we are crossing to the bank of england to hear from bank of england to hearfrom mark carney and then the prime minister, theresa may. here is the governor. inaudible. we are trying to sort out the sound so you can hear what mark carney is saying and any minute now it will be sorted. there will be so many microphones that it is untrue and it is just somebody not pressing the right button. please bear with us. inaudible. i am going to apologise again for the lack of sound, the
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lack of volume, they are trying to sort it out, i promise. inaudible. 0k, ok, while we sort that out, we will talk a bit more about ben stokes. i do apologise. it will be sorted before the prime minister starts, i promise. back to ben stokes. the cricketer was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm in the early hours of monday morning. police say he was detained overnight and released while investigations continue. he has not commented on whether it is indeed him in the footage obtained by the sun. have a look. bleep. stop! stop!
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bleep. stop. come on. bleep. the ecb gave a brief statement after the deer appeared. they said they had seen the footage for the first time tonight when posted by the sun. there is an ongoing police investigation which will look at all available evidence and we have got to respect that process. we can talk now to the former england captain, michael vaughan. how are you? hello, michael. can you hear me? i think we
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need to open the fader on michael vaughan. can you hear me? i will try one more time. you know i am persistent on this programme. clearly he is not there. i do apologise. let's go back to the bank of england and hope we have sorted this out. here is the governor, mark carney. how inflation target... subject to achieving the target the npc is also required to support the government's economic policy which is currently to achieve strong, sustainable and balanced growth. under this system, when mervyn king returned constrained compression, the bank of
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england takes its remit and it is accountable to the people. the exaggerations of parliament and the people have changed since the days when montagu norman justified people have changed since the days when montagu normanjustified his decisions to a predecessor at the treasury select committee by appealing to his instincts. not a response i have dared to mention during my 30 parliamentary testimonies and you know i am in trouble when i do! the need for the bank to be open and accountable is greater than ever. not least because ofa greater than ever. not least because of a growing distrust of institutions and the experts who reside within them. but also because better public understanding makes our policy is more effective at that is why the bank of england has dramatically upscaled its coverage. we now publish all the relevant information for our decisions on the day that a decision is released. we disclose all the keyjudgments underlying our forecast and we
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account for differences with those forecasts when they occur. we leverage our network of 12 regional agencies by meeting with businesses every year across the country, discussing with tens of thousands of people who attend our town halls and our public forums. and we engage with hundreds of thousands more over social media. turning to the performance, the gains of independence have been enormous. in the two decades that followed, inflation averaged just below 2% compared with over 50% in the two decades preceding. inflation has also been one fifth as volatile. crucially the independence and credibility came with it, allowing monetary policy to respond effectively to the biggest financial crisis in a century. it leaves the bank of england well placed to address a range of developments.
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over the last 20 years we have learned a few lessons that i will highlight before closing. the first is that the financial crisis exposed how a healthy focus on price stability could become a dangerous distraction. central banks won the war against inflation during the great moderation only to lose the peace as vulnerabilities built inexorably. monetary policies not best placed to address the risk to financial stability but the challenge is that the necessary financial policy decisions are also subject to time inconsistency. financial lobbies are strong and the temptations of a rush to growth are powerful. conversely there are no obvious or immediate rewards to taking tough decisions that are necessary to avoid a future crisis. in the world financial stability,
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success an orphan. and that is why when the bank of england was fundamentally reformed after the crisis, the procedures and structures of the npc were largely replicated in the bank's two new committees, the ftc and the prc. crucially all of the bank committees have access to all of the bank's information and analysis. they are all about each other‘s reaction functions and they can all coordinate their policies if it is appropriate. the bank of england's committees are independent but they are not isolated. the second lesson of the past two decades has been the importance of flexibility in flexible inflation targeting. while the inflation target applies at all times, our remit has always acknowledged that inflation may deviate temporarily from target on account of shocks, and since 2013,
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the remit has explicitly recognised that in exceptional circumstances, bringing inflation back to target to rapidly could cause undesirable volatility in output and employment. in exceptional circumstances such as today, when the economy is facing profound structural change, the npc can extend the horizon over which it returns inflation to target from above in order to balance the effect onjobs and above in order to balance the effect on jobs and activity. after all, even though monetary per to cannot prevent —— monetary policy committee prevent —— monetary policy committee prevent the issues with trading arrangements with the eu, it can influence how the income is distributed between job losses and price rises. this brings me to my next point. it cannot deliver
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lasting prosperity and it cannot solve broader societal challenges. this bears emphasising because in recent yea rs this bears emphasising because in recent years a host of issues have been laid at the door of the bank of england, from housing affordability to poor productivity. calls for the bank to solve these challenges ignore our carefully defined objectives and they confuse independence with omnipotent. monetary and financial stability are foundational. they are necessary for prosperity but they are not sufficient to deliver it. the biggest determinants of the uk's medium term prosperity will be the country's new relationship with the eu and the series of reforms that that relationship catalyses. most of the necessary adjustments are real in nature and therefore not in the gift of monetary policymakers. but the bank will do everything it can to support the adjustment consistent with its statutory obligations. we
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will continue to assess and express our independent assessment of the risks associated with brexit. we will use all our power is consistent with our remit to mitigate that risk and smooth the adjustment and new opportunities. monetary per the will continue to be set to achieve the inflation target in a way that helps smooth real adjustment and supports the creation of jobs smooth real adjustment and supports the creation ofjobs in the wake of very large external forces. we will make sure banks are capitalised so they can withstand any severe shock, however unlikely. any severe shock that could be associated with brexit and still be able to meet the demands of households and businesses for credit. the financial system as a whole will have the capacity to finance the transition and seize the opportunities that come beyond. these are the best contributions that the bank of england can make for the good of the people of the united kingdom. so ultimately the
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prosperity of the uk will reflect not just the final brexit arrangements, but also the government's broaderfiscal arrangements, but also the government's broader fiscal and structural policies, and the first speaker at this conference is best placed to address these topics. now, it could have been very different. as some of you know, the prime minister began her career as a new graduate at the bank of england, before leaving after six years to pursue other interests, ultimately politics. while at the bank, the prime minister worked in our economic intelligence department, the cutting edge then of our activities. she accomplished many great things and was destined for many more. just imagine, prime minister, what could have become of your career if you had stayed! you could have been here in fishmonger is all introducing yourself! instead you have come here by the road less travelled. theresa may was elected
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mpfor travelled. theresa may was elected mp for maidenhead in 1997, just as the bank was getting to grips with its new—found independence. she held a number of positions in the shadow cabinet and served as chair of the conservative party. after the formation of the coalition government in 2010, she would become the longest serving home secretary in over 60 years during a period where she confronted many of society's biggest challenges, for example introducing legislation to tackle domestic violence, to eradicate modern slavery and to counterterrorism. never afraid of a challenge, she stepped into the breach to become prime minister following the referendum. the prime minister and her government are committed to making the most of the opportunities that brexit brings, and more fundamentally to working to build a stronger, fairer and more prosperous country for all. so please join prosperous country for all. so pleasejoin me in welcoming the prime minister, theresa may. thank you. applause
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thank you. applause thank you. applause thank you. thank you, governor, for that introduction and as one who you just heard began her professional life that the bank of england some 40 years ago, it is a great pleasure to address conference today. your reference to where i worked in the bag reminded me that when i applied to the bank of england as a geography graduate, when they asked what part of the bank would like to work in, i put international department, because i thought it would fit with geography but they chose to put me in economic intelligence! when i first started working for the bank in 1977 it was a very different institution to what we see today. banking then was a professional shrouded in secrecy. the story mervyn king tells, when he first joined the story mervyn king tells, when he firstjoined the the story mervyn king tells, when he first joined the bank the story mervyn king tells, when he firstjoined the bank of england, he asked paul volker, the chairman of
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the federal reserve and reagan, what qualities a central banker should seek to embody. his reply? "mystique". much has changed in the years since, and for the better. the new governor has contributed to that improvement through the reforms you have led through the bank of england. openness and transparency are defining characteristics of a modern central bank. this conference celebrates an important milestone in the evolution of this institution. the granting of operational independence. the newly elected labour government decided shortly after the 1997 general election that they would do what successive governors and indeed some conservative chancellors had long talked about. give the bank responsibility for setting the official short—term interest rate. asa official short—term interest rate. as a newly elected mp at the time, i remember those debates well. looking back on them now after 20 years in
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which independent monetary policy— making has become which independent monetary policy—making has become the norm around the world, the disagreements which divided the house of commons on the issue seem rather academic. the successful adoption of inflation targeting in 1992 had already taken much of the political heat out of the setting of rates, and the fears of absence of a formal dual mandate to protect employment as well as targeting inflation might putjobs at risk have proved unfounded. let me pay tribute to you, governor, your predecessors, lord king of rothbury and the late lord george, and all of the members who served on the monetary policy committee over the monetary policy committee over the last two decades. you had been dedicated groups of public servants, motivated to serve public interest and discharge responsibility in which parliament has given you to the best of your ability. there is a lot to be proud of over the last 20 years. whatever the debate at the time, there was never any real disagreement about the aim of what
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monetary policy should be to eliminate high inflation which bedevilled the british economy for decades. at the start of inflation targeting in 1992 and operational independence in 1987, that is what the bank helped to achieve. as it has another countries, central bank independence helped improve in could ability and accountability, successfully anchoring inflation expectations and contributing to low and stable inflation. the results have been impressive. since independence, uk inflation has been much more stable than it was previously, when it fluctuated from 196 previously, when it fluctuated from 1% to 22%. inflation hurts ordinary people, and low stable inflation benefits households and businesses. inflation of 22% sounds outlandish -- 22% inflation of 22% sounds outlandish —— 22% sounds outlandish, and that is attributed to you that it does not happen today. we cannot look
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back at the last 20 years without complacency. inflation targeting and operational independence contributed toa operational independence contributed to a period of steady growth, low and stable inflation, and general expansion in the ten years after 1997. the problems while developing, which later became apparent in the financial crisis of 2007—2008. the great recession which followed the crisis brought some of the most challenging economic times our country has known. the bank was inevitably caught up in dramatic events of 2007 and 2008. the tripartite regulatory system of which the bank was part did not prove a success. it failed the country during the financial crisis, and we have had to live with the consequences of the failure ever since. ourgdp consequences of the failure ever since. our gdp fell by more than 6%, as the uk enjoyed our deepest recession since the second world war. successive governments have been forced to take difficult decisions to restore public finances
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to order. these have been decisions which no government would ever want to take. the british people, who played no part in causing the financial crisis, have had to make sacrifices to return the economy to health, and ease the burden of debt on future generations. real progress has been made over the last seven years. the bank has played its part, using its independent monetary policy tools of interest rates and quantitative easing to support the economy through the crisis and into recovery. the government has worked to repairour recovery. the government has worked to repair our country's finances and the latest public sector borrowing figures show the deficit has been reduced by more than two thirds, from a post—war high of 10% of gdp in 2009 and 2010 to 2.3% in 2016-17. in truth, much work remains ahead of us, and for all of our progress we should neither forget or underestimate the scale of the sacrifices which have been necessary to get us this far. the impact the
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sacrifices have had on ordinary working people have led some to lose faith in free market capitalism. globalisation, which has brought us a great many benefits, has also brought change which has contributed toa brought change which has contributed to a wider sense that the economy is not working as it should for everybody in our society. these are understandable responses, there are genuine problems with our economy which need to be addressed. as we do so, we should never forget the immense value and potential of an open innovative free market economy, which operates with the right rules and regulations. when countries make the transition to closed —— from closed economies to free—market policies, the same things happen. life expectancy increases and infant mortality falls, absolute poverty shrinks and disposable income grows. access to education is widened and
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rates of illiterate —— of illiteracy plummets. more people have the chance to contribute. it is an open free—market chance to contribute. it is an open free— market economy chance to contribute. it is an open free—market economy in which technological breakthroughs are made which can improve and save lives. it is an open free—market economy where personal freedoms and liberties find their surest protection. a free—market their surest protection. a free— market economy their surest protection. a free—market economy operating under the right rules and regulations is the right rules and regulations is the greatest agent of collective human progress ever created. it was the new combination which led societies out of darkness and stagnation and into the light of the modern age. in essence, it is very simple. it consists of an open marketplace in which everyone is free to participate. regulated under the rule of law with personal freedoms and quality and human rights democratically guaranteed. and unaccountable government, progressively taxing the economic activity of the market generates.
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public services are freely available to all citizens according to need. that is unquestionably the best and indeed the only sustainable means of increasing living standards of everyone in a country. we should never forget that raising the living standards and protecting the jobs of ordinary working people is the central aim of all economic policy. helping each generation to live longer, fella and more secure lives than the one which befell them. —— more full. not an abstract or ideological concept but serving the real interests of the british people. those who believe that the best interests of the british people are best served through an open and free market economy need to be honest about where it is not currently working or delivering for ordinary working people today. that's why the government is leading a determined programme of wide reaching economic reform. we have already overhauled our system of banking regulation to put the bank
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of england at the centre of the new framework. the financial policy committee protects stability through macro credential regulation, we are served with micro—potential regulators and the financial conduct authority regulates the conduct of businesses in our vibrant financial sector. we implemented recommendations of the independent commission on banking and the parliamentary commission on banking standards. putting in place strict new rules on bank ring fencing and enhancing individual accountability to raise standards. the economy has made great strides in the last few years. but we know that for too long, too many communities across the united kingdom have not seen the benefits of economic growth and prosperity. that waste of potential is bad for the areas concerned and bad for wider productivity. the bank has always ta ken bad for wider productivity. the bank has always taken economic health as a whole uk seriously, as a formidable network of local agents
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based in the nations and regions of the uk testify. through our industrial strategy, the government pays its part in promoting growth across the whole country. that strategy helps business invest in the latest technologies and local areas of excellence and national export champions, supporting the skills and innovation we need to succeed in industries of the future. a thriving financial services sector providing high—quality jobs across the united kingdom, vital to our future prosperity. the sector benefits from a strong and respected framework of regulation, which incentivises innovation. we will work with the sector to ensure the uk reminds the world's financial ce ntre uk reminds the world's financial centre and the global hub of thin tech. britain now has a record numberof tech. britain now has a record number of people in work. and a flexible labour market has contributed to that success. many people value the flexibility of our system, but that flexibility cannot
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be one—sided. that is why i commissioned matthew taylor to conduct a thorough review into modern employment practices in our economy. his report recommended all work should be fair and decent, with scope for development and fulfilment. that is an ambition we fully share. britain has some of the world's very best high education, researchers, institutions and engineers, but we know our system of edger technical education use too many young people without the skills they need to get a job. that holds them back and hurts the economy. new qualifications will reverse decades of drift and create a high—quality vocational equivalent to a—levels. britain says a global standard for high—quality global governance, but we know that to stay competitive we must keep our standards high and ensure that bad examples of corporate governance do not undermine the public's faith in our market economy. our reforms to
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corporate governance will give workers and shareholders a stronger voice in the boardroom. ensuring our biggest firms are incentivised to ta ke biggest firms are incentivised to take decisions which are in the right long—term interests of the. these reforms bring greater transparency, openness and accountability to markets and the corporate sector. the very same principles that the bank has lived up principles that the bank has lived up to in its work through the monetary policy committee. some argue a free—market economy is an end in itself, and drawing attention to the downsides is somehow anti—business. others would use the imbalances which are now apparent as a justification for the total rejection of the free—market economy, which has done so much to improve our lives. instead they advocate ideological extreme policies which long ago were shown to fail, which are failing people today in places like venezuela. my argument has always been that if you wa nt argument has always been that if you want to preserve and improve a syste m want to preserve and improve a
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system which has delivered unparalleled benefit, you have to ta ke unparalleled benefit, you have to take seriously its faults and do all you can to address them. not to do so would put everything we've achieved together as a country at risk. it would lead to a wider loss of faith in free markets and risk a return to the failed ideologies of the past. a return to protectionism and international trade and inflationary policies at home. far from somehow protecting the poorest and most honourable in our society, that outcome would surely hurt them the most. this is a crucial time to address these fundamental economic questions. last week in florence, i set out my vision for the new economic partnership by which i want our country to build with the eu in the years ahead. that vision is rooted in a belief in a well regulated open free—market economy with sound money and stable prices. asl with sound money and stable prices. as i set out in leaving the eu, the uk will no longer be members of the single market or customs union. that
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of course means changes. you cannot have all of the benefits of membership of the single market without obligations. so, ourtask membership of the single market without obligations. so, our task is to find a new framework that allows for a close economic partnership that holds those rights and obligations in new and different balance. in forging a partnership, that new partnership, we start from an unprecedented position, at the point of our exit we have exactly the same rules and regulations as the same rules and regulations as the eu as our eu withdrawal bill ensures that they are carried over into domestic law. the challenge is not to bring our rules and regulators close together but what to do when one of us wants to make changes. that fact should give us confidence and i believe there are further good reasons to be ambitious and optimistic about what lies ahead. the uk is one of the largest economies in the world and eu's largest economies in the world and eu's biggest export market. jobs across the continent rely on our shared trade and more fundamentally we share a common commitment to the
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principles of an open free market economy which i referred to earlier. we believe in free trade, in rigorous and fair competition, in strong consumer rights, and a rejection of protectionism. and whether it is on birds or on services, including the excellent financial services for which the uk has a global reputation, creating needless new barriers to trade between eu and its biggest market would benefit no one. the uk's financial markets provide support for businesses and consumers right across the eu. reducing the cost of capital and supporting choice and innovation for consumers. it is in neither the eu's nor the innovation for consumers. it is in neitherthe eu's northe uk's interest to see these financial service markets fragment. that is another reason i am confident we can agree a new partnership that enables us to continue to work together to bring prosperity to all our peoples. and that is the responsibility that democratically elected governments and institutions dedicated to the
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public good like the bank of england both share, to promote the prosperity of the people we serve. for the bank of england, strengthened and improved since the financial crisis, that means discharging its responsibilities to keep inflation on target and maintain the wider health and stability of the financial sector. for the government, that means stepping up to its role, ensuring that the rules and regulations that defined the free market are designed to serve the interests of ordinary working people. success in this mission must be underpinned by a balanced approach to public spending. that means continuing to deal with our debts so the economy can remain strong and we can protect people'sjobs. at the same time it means investing in vital public services like schools and hospitals which our successful management of the economy has made possible. to abandon that balanced approach with unfunded borrowing and higher levels of taxation would damage our economy, threatenjobs of taxation would damage our economy, threaten jobs and of taxation would damage our economy, threatenjobs and hurt working people. it would mean paying more in debt interest which already
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costs us more each year than we spend on schools. ultimately it would mean less money for the public services we all rely on. so we can already see an outline of the challenges and opportunities that will define the bank's third decade of independence. building a new economic partnership with european union, which will deliver prosperity for all our people, making the most of the opportunities which brexit presents. reforming our economy, so the benefits of a well regulated free market felt in all parts of our country and by everyone in our society, and taking a balanced approach to public spending so debt falls as our economy grows, and we can invest in the public services on which we all depend. i have no doubt that the bank will continue its work to deliver the monetary and financial stability that is essential for a successful economy as we make the most of the opportunities ahead. governor, i wish you and your distinguished guests well over the next two days
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as you explore what the future may hold. thank you. a we are going to wait because within journalists can ask questions. the top line from that speech is that the free market economy improves people's lives. let's listen to some questions right now. we are going to ta ke questions right now. we are going to take a few questions. inaudible. one of the faults that you identified was that the bank's programme of ultralow interest rates
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and quantitative easing have had fired side—effects particularly on poor people. what should be done about that? —— bad side—effects. necessary action was rightly taken by an independent bank, but it does have applications for others. i was pointing out some of those implications. of course what then happens, as we have done, it is up to government to look to see what it considers necessary and can do to mitigate any implications which it feels do need to be addressed, such as for example the steps we have taken to encourage saving. as we know, low interest rates are good news for borrowers but not good news for savers. what happens is then for government to look to see if it should mitigate any of those side—effects, any of those applications of the action taken. prime minister, you said you reject
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protectionism and you have also made it very clear how happy you are with the decision of the trump administration to impose punitive ta riffs administration to impose punitive tariffs on bombarding —— bombardier. can you reassure us that you are not going to enter a tit—for—tat trade deal with united states?m going to enter a tit—for—tat trade dealwith united states? ifi can comment on the bombardier issue, this is very important for the uk because the impact onjobs in northern ireland, there are 4000 people employed by them in northern ireland. the judgment that came out isa ireland. the judgment that came out is a preliminaryjudging, preliminary finding, and i will continue to work with the canadian prime minister and the canadian government and indeed i spoke to both arlene foster and mr o'neill from the dup yesterday about how we can work together to impress upon
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the american government the importance of bombardier to northern ireland. and in relation to boeing, we have a long—term partnership with them. various aspects of government. and this is not the sort of behaviour we expect from a long—term partner and it undermines that partnership. but on the wider issue, i think there is a real challenge for us globally today. i think there are aspects of protectionism creeping in around the world. i have said before, ithink, that i creeping in around the world. i have said before, i think, that i want the uk to be a global champion of free trade. those of us who believe in free trade need to stand up and notjust explain its in free trade need to stand up and not just explain its wider benefits, but help to explain its benefits to individuals. there are people who feel that globalisation has left them behind. we need to make sure that our country, our economy, is working for everyone but we also need to show why free trade is so important in raising living standards, in developing the growth of economies, in bringing prosperity into our countries. i think that is
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a discussion we now need to have because we do see elements of protectionism creeping in around the world. prime minister, we and many other financial firms are intensely focused on contributing to responsible finance. many of their ways we do this by hiring from disadvantaged sectors of society, hiring from state schools, deliberate programme to push in this direction which addresses many of theissues direction which addresses many of the issues we have talked about. but we also need responsible politics. to do that, we need to be able to stay here in this great city and this great country. my question would be how can you help us get some certainty that the transition period which you have outlined, which we all welcome, as a likely outcome, that this doesn't lead to simplya outcome, that this doesn't lead to simply a longer period of uncertainty of where we end up at the end of the transition period,
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whether it is two or three or four yea rs ? whether it is two or three or four years? i notice you have left an open window how long that period could be in your speech in florence. it is very important that the transition story does not suddenly become an excuse for not knowing what comes at the end of the road. can you give us any indication of how we can stay in this great city, this great financial centre, and this great financial centre, and this great financial centre, and this great country? of course we wa nt this great country? of course we want to do everything we can to make sure that we can continue to see the city of london playing its role as the global financial centre and we wa nt the global financial centre and we want to see firms staying here as they have done and the contribution they have done and the contribution they have done and the contribution they have made. i use the phrase implementation period very specifically because this is a period of time that will be necessary to prevent any practical changes that are needed as a result of our exiting the eu and the new partnership that we will have built. by partnership that we will have built. by definition, you can only have
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that if you know what that end state, what the final partnership is, that you are working towards. the timeline that i see is that we agree what that new deep and special partnership is, we agree what that economic partnership is, and within our other issues that we have got to agree like security. and then that recommendation period is there in order to just recommendation period is there in order tojust put those practical changes in place. some of those will be for government, it systems changing in certain areas for example. as i said in my speech in florence, what is important is the double lock. the double lock is that you know that that in fermentation period will be there, so there is a period will be there, so there is a period of time to adjust, no cliff edge. —— implementation period. and it could be that bits of the augmentation can be brought forward, which could be done without disrupting the process. —— the implementation. the idea is to have ordered and smooth withdrawal and thatis
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ordered and smooth withdrawal and that is why that period is there but it will definitely be time limited because we are leaving the eu in march 2019. theresa may speaking at the bank of england. the final question was about brexit and how long the transition period would go on forbes and whether it would lead to more uncertainty. the topline of the speech, she was saying that the free market economy includes your life, effectively. she said it is unquestionably the best and only sustainable means of increasing the living standards of everyone in this country, in any country she said, and raising living standards of ordinary people is the central aim of all economic policy. she said her government will continue with its balanced approach, and that's dealing with our debts. she pointed out that our country's debt interest per year costs us more than we spend on schools. she said that the
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free—market economy in her opinion means that poverty falls, access to education widens, and we live longer. there will be more reaction to her speech throughout the day on bbc news. good morning and welcome to the programme. ryanair could be prosecuted for misleading passengers as thousands more passengers face disruption after the airline cancelled more flights over the winter. the airline is being threatened with legal action by the civil aviation authority because last week ryanair‘s boss michael o'leary said there wouldn't be any further cancellations as a result of the pilot rotor issue. not true. another 18,000 flights will be grounded between november and march next year. that is because the airline has announced that 25 fewer planes will be in operation during that period. 34 route will be suspended entirely including sta nsted to edinburgh suspended entirely including stansted to edinburgh and stansted to glasgow as well as gatwick to belfast. earlier this month, the
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airline cancelled 50 flights per day until the end of october which will affect 315,000 customers, saying they had messed up their pilots' holliday rotors. the latest cancellations will run until march next year and bring the total number of people affected to several hundred thousand. —— 700,000. ryanairsaid it hundred thousand. —— 700,000. ryanair said it would allow them to give all the extra pirate leave necessary until the end of 2017. sarah and charlotte have both just had flights cancelled by ryanair. and also julian bray had flights cancelled by ryanair. and alsojulian bray is an aviation expert. sarah, what has happened to you? my mum and i booked a flight to go to lisbon in the first weekend in december and we got an email yesterday saying it had been cancelled. how did you react when that email landed in your inbox?” suppose the kind of expected it, sadly. even though michael o'leary
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had said not long ago that there would be no further cancellations? there is no trust, that is the sad thing. it is disappointing because as it stands, my mom and i are not going away but hopefully we can rebook. we got given some vouchers, £80 each, which on the face of it seems generous. but actually you have got to book the flight in october and the flights are only from november to march, so during the time of being unsettled. will you use rya nair? the time of being unsettled. will you use ryanair? not for the lisbon trip. i think it is nice to get away and it is tempting but it is disrespectful towards their customers. what has happened to you, charlotte ? customers. what has happened to you, charlotte? i got an email yesterday andl charlotte? i got an email yesterday and i thought i had avoided it actually. it actually went into my junk inbox. good job i double checked it. it is a surprise trip i
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have got for my boyfriend for his christmas present sol have got for my boyfriend for his christmas present so i can't say too much! it is the return flight that they have cancelled on me. i saw that yesterday and i am raging. i thought i had got away with it. ryanair offered me the choice to refu nd ryanair offered me the choice to refund my outgoing flight as well. i have completely cancelled and refunded the whole trip.” have completely cancelled and refunded the whole trip. i booked with a completely different airline, sol with a completely different airline, soigo with a completely different airline, so i go with the same airline there and back. would you ever book with them again? same as the previous caller, they offered us £80 each, it is 40 euros per leg. you have two book the flight in october to use it until march already. am i looking a gift horse in the mouth...? imagine you both use the voucher, would you
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book with them after? no, i would definitely look at other airlines first, i've only used them before because they've been cheap and the flight because they've been cheap and the flight times have been great, but... same for you, flight times have been great, but... same foryou, sarah? flight times have been great, but... same for you, sarah? i would absolutely try and get another airline but if it was only ryanair, then i probably would. which is awful. the civil aviation authority could prosecute rya nair for misleading passengers because michael o'leary, the boss, said there would not be further cancellations and there are. what does that mean in practical terms, what would a section michael cole sanction be from the caa? it hasn't reached that stage yet, they will consult for the next few days, and following that they will consider whether the investigation should go forward. meanwhile ryanair have said whatever the caa say, they abide by it, they said that this morning. they negate the need for any caa
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investigation but of course, ryanair is sourced out of dublin so the irish aviation authority will need to be involved out of this as well. is it likely they can get away with cancelling flights, involving 700,000 passengers? yes, is the short answer, simply because they are taking out 25 planes, they mothballed 25 planes which of course frees up the crew. an average free cruise to a plane, you have 75 extra crews available to work the rest of the schedule. 2300 flights per day are carried out by ryanair. it is a small proportion, and 2%. that is no consolation to sarah, charlotte and the others, is it? no, it isn't, they have been given vouchers, it is
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40 euros per leg. if you have a return flight, you get 80 euros. it's clever because ryanair know that it it's clever because ryanair know thatitis it's clever because ryanair know that it is going to be terrible over the next few months. a lot of unhappy people but they are saying, here isa unhappy people but they are saying, here is a free flight after that period or towards the end of the period or towards the end of the period so what will you do? use the voucher or terror top and buy a more expensive flight is why —— bought here it up and buy a expensive flight is why —— bought here it up and buya more expensive flight is why —— bought here it up and buy a more expensive flight here it up and buy a more expensive flight elsewhere ? here it up and buy a more expensive flight elsewhere? you fly between novemberand march, it flight elsewhere? you fly between november and march, it is when flights had been reduced so my concern is ibook with the £80 voucher and concern is ibook with the £80 voucherand i'm in concern is ibook with the £80 voucher and i'm in exactly the same position. what they are trying to do is actually ensure that it is only a particular period that will cause disruption. so there will be no further cancellations, mind you they said this before. we do not really know if it is actually on the cards but what they are doing is cleaning it up once and for all. the problems really is that the pilots refuse to
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give back their leave entitlement, in return for a bonus payment. it has really messed everything up for them. if ryanair had offered more money, then perhaps more pilots would have given up their leave? you are quite right, not only that but they could have least in planes and crews from other airlines to pick up the slack, and then he would not have this disruption but they have said they will not do that. at the moment, they haven't actually been booking people onto other airlines. i must admit that the wording is vague. they have just been offering future ryanair vague. they have just been offering future rya nair flights to vague. they have just been offering future ryanair flights to make up. thank you very much, julian bray and sarah and charlotte. thank you. and thank you for your comments. ryanair has issued a response, saying "we already comply fully with all eu261 legislation, are meeting with the caa and will comply fully with whatever requirements they ask us to." e—mails and messages from you about
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sexual harassment on a night out, we had a conversation earlier because of research out today suggesting that for many young people it is the norm. sam says that sexual harassment is unbelievably common in university clubs. being a man it does not happen to me that often but you had to look out for your friends. on a regular night out we move our friends to another part of the club to avoid guys threatening and grinding and gripping the women in ourgroup. a and grinding and gripping the women in our group. a text says that they we re in our group. a text says that they were a victim of sexual assault, a man grabbed my genitals in the gay village of manchester, i am gay but he had no right to do that. i was helped by my friend who held the man for police. on a different occasion, he put his hand down my shorts and grabbed my genitals, ifroze. this
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is from joanna, there is nothing new about sexual harassment for a new generation of women, but women no longer accept it or they feel that their voice will not be heard. keep those coming in. the hurricane—battered british overseas territories look "apocalyptic" and like "something out of a horror movie", the international development secretary has said. the british virgin islands have been destroyed by a lethal combination of hurricane irma and maria. we're in contact with some of the residents living there, who we'll be speaking to in a moment. one of those is sarah penny a resident on the island of tortola — she's been keeping a video diary for us documenting efforts on the island to rebuild. behind me, you will see what has sort of become a wrecked car graveyard. but it is actually a really positive thing. these are all vehicles that were destroyed, damaged, and had been blocking all the roads. the heavy duty equipment that actually people own privately, even the day after the storm, they were out hauling and towing cars out of the way to allow movement through the country. what we are driving past right now, this long queue of cars all the way
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up what is our dual carriageway is what you have to sit in now to try to get petrol. it is one of the hardest things about life right now in the bb! is that i believe there is only three gas stations that are functioning, so it makes the task of getting fuel... typically, it can be even a two to three hour experience. some people report having to wait six hours. we're passing our waterfront condos, you will see one space that looks as if it is a doll house. you just see straight in. there was a big pile of rubbish there which is also the norm at this point in time because waste management is a challenge. you willjust see sort of piles and piles of debris. people do their best. we can speak now to sarah penny, we first spoke to her last week.
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she's currently living in her office with her 70—year—old mother and eight—month—old son because their homes are uninhabitable. and brigadierjohn bridge, the most senior member of british army in the caribbean who is in charge of the relief operation. we spoke to him a couple of weeks ago. earlier this week britain's biggest warship, hms ocean, arrived in the british virgin islands to provide support for those affected. sarah, tell our british audience about living conditions at the moment? yes, as you said, i'm with my son daniel, and my mum, we are living in my office. at this point in time, we are much better off. then others. we have at least access to some running water. and a little bit of power. i have so many friends, friends and family, right
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now there may be eight of them to one bedroom space. trying to make do. we know that the electricity company here is doing the absolute best. as you mentioned, hms ocean has been here and given us a lot of inspiration and hope because we have seen the soldiers and seen the support which has come from the uk, working together with the service crews on the ground to try and get things back to some place of operation. it is imperfect. we are not living in our homes. i don't wa nt to not living in our homes. i don't want to ever set and well and what isn't perfect about it, because the whole country is dealing with what irma brought to our island. and we would change it if we could but we are trying to do the best that we
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can, and be great for each day for the fact that we are alive. that is an incredible attitude that you have. how stressful is it on a day—to—day basis for you at the moment? hmm, it is early here and i am tired so i am feeling a little bit more... emotional, i suppose. most days you get up and it is great. you have gratitude and you get out and you get things done, and i know truly many of us here on the ground feel that we are doing better. better at managing the trauma, i think, better. better at managing the trauma, ithink, and better. better at managing the trauma, i think, and the stress than those who have either left the island or were not here for the hurricane. because many that are not here have a true sense of powerlessness. those of us but are here, there is the stress to it. we are surrounded by the destruction of our country. i think there is an
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inherent stress in that because there is so much unknown about our future. that is the most stressful pa rt future. that is the most stressful part of it. sarah, let me bring in brigadierjohn bridge, he can speak to us, thank you for talking to us again. you can hear the emotion in sarah's voice which is completely understandable. tell us about the kind of work that you have been able to do since we last spoke. what i would say is what sarah is saying, that resilience and determination is what we see day in, day out, from the local population. it is staggering to see what they have achieved. this is very much what they have delivered. two weeks ago, i was out there and back there again three days ago. the difference is staggering. this is people going out in the streets and rebuilding their houses which is incredible. we contributed to that as much as we can. you mentioned hms ocean, she
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made a big difference, helicopters could be used to move aid around, and a whole lot of engineers were able to go and assist. alongside the local government and employees, getting the power station running, the water situation has significantly improved. it is a big step forward. that resilience and determination for the population is truly humbling. how long will you be therefore, do you think? do you have any idea? we are going through plans at the moment, our departure as a military will be conditions —based, we do not leave until the job we need to do is done, simple as that but we are also conscious of the fa ct but we are also conscious of the fact that this is very much a civilian led effort. i work for a senior department for international do that and. —— for international to
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the. what we do, as and when local government structures are fully up and running, we slowly move away. that's the proposal and what we are doing at the moment. thank you for your time doing at the moment. thank you for yourtime and sarah, doing at the moment. thank you for your time and sarah, thank you. doing at the moment. thank you for yourtime and sarah, thank you. we appreciate you getting up early in the morning to talk to us. we wish you all the best. thank you. next, a serious case review into the murder of a teenage teenage woman at a residential home for people with asberger‘s syndrome has found that her death could have been predicted and prevented. melissa mathieson was 18 when she was murdered byjason conroy at alexandra house in bristol. our corespondent helena lee is here. what happened ? what happened? in 2014, melissa was ata what happened? in 2014, melissa was at a residential high dependency unit in bristol, she had asperger‘s
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syndrome and there she was attacked by another resident, jason conroy, also 18 years old at the time. he strangled her and try to take her into his bedroom, staff realised what was going on and called the ambulance and she was taken to hospital. she died a couple of days later. he was convicted in 2015 for her murder. during the trial, the jury her murder. during the trial, the jury heard how melissa had complained that he had been stalking her and that he had scared her, and also we heard in the court as well, it emerged from the prosecution that he had sexualised behaviour in the past. he was convicted, sentenced to 19 years in prison in 2015. and the review, which has just 19 years in prison in 2015. and the review, which hasjust been released, suggested, or says clearly, that what happened could have been predicted and therefore stopped? exactly. we had the report in the last 30 minutes, carried out by the bristol safeguarding board.
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the conclusion is that the review found that melissa's death is, as you say, could have been prevented if better processes were in place. a couple of things in that report, jason conroy, the defendant, he was described as having extreme sexualised behaviour, as far back as 2007. while he was at a residential school. they also found he tried to strangle and other female school. they also found he tried to strangle and otherfemale member of staff. that incident was reported to police and a forensic assessment, the report concluded, that he posed a high risk of future physical harm and sexualised behaviour. the report also found the place where melissa was put, they found the setting was anfor was put, they found the setting was an for melissa, she suffered, as i say, from asperger‘s syndrome and had been assessed as being at risk of being exploited and is vulnerable in most situations. thank you.
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these are the bbc news headlines. theresa may has mounted a strong defence of the free market economy. ina defence of the free market economy. in a speech at the bank of england. the prime minister insisted that "strict new rules" on banking and finance were working and she said continuing to deal with our debts is the way to strengthen the economy. a serious case review into the killing of a teenage woman at a residential home for people with asperger‘s syndrome has found her death could have been prevented if better processes had been in place. melissa mathieson was 18 when she was murdered byjason conroy at alexandra house in bristol. she had previously told staff that she was being stalked and that conroy scared her.
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in 2015, after conroy was jailed. his trial found that he had intended to have sex with melissa after he'd killed her. rya nair has been threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched enforcement action against europe's biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption. it's the first step towards court action. sarah corker reports. children are being warned not to stop and take pictures if they're caught up in a terror attack. the advice is part of a new campaign aimed at young people following an increased number of attacks in the uk. police also want the safety measures to be introduced in classrooms. it comes after images of the bomb at parsons green were posted online within minutes. hugh hefner, who founded playboy
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magazine, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises inc said he passed away peacefully at home, from natural causes. hefner began publishing playboy in his kitchen in 1953. it became the largest—selling men's magazine in the world, shifting seven—million copies a month at its peak. his son cooper hefner said he would be "greatly missed by many". that's a summary of the latest bbc news. england has started disciplinary procedures after ben stokes's arrest following a brawl in bristol. no charges have been brought as investigations continue. the video has been released by the sun which a p pa re ntly has been released by the sun which apparently shows the fight the ben stokes was involved in. this video
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has not been independently verified and just to warn you, it is fairly graphic. it shows a man who closely resembles ben stokes involved in a brawl. these are stills from the video. he is seen to repeatedly threw punches towards two men. we know that one man needed to go to hospitalfor know that one man needed to go to hospital for treatment with facial injuries. ben stokes suffered a minor fracture injuries. ben stokes suffered a minorfracture to a injuries. ben stokes suffered a minor fracture to a bone in injuries. ben stokes suffered a minorfracture to a bone in his hand on the night of the incident. he was named in the ashes squad yesterday, retaining the vice captaincy. he has apologised to the ecb and is said to be devastated and fragile and well aware of the magnitude of what has happened. ben stokes was dropped from yesterday's match at the oval which saw england win the one day series against the west indies. moeen ali had a quickfire 48 runs to get them just over the line, chasing 57. rain stopped play in a 36th over with england on 258—5. that was enough thank you moeen ali's knock. they one by six runs under the
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duckworth—lewis turned method. there are 3—0 up in that series with just one to play. it was a good night for british teams in the champions league last night. 3 wins out of three, the most impressive was in madrid as chelsea came from behind to beat atletico 2—1 with the last kick of the match. antoine griezman had put the home side in front from the spot. alvaro morata equalised for the blues and michi batshuayi got their winner in injury remember their former striker diego costa was frozen out time. remember their former striker diego costa was frozen out and has rejoined atletico. he was in the stands and was less than pleased. celtics started the group stage by getting thumped the body that was responsible for the management of grenfell tower
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has had its contract to maintain social housing in kensington and chelsea terminated. what has happened? the council voted unanimously last night to strip this organisation of its responsibility. it is the kensington and chelsea te na nt it is the kensington and chelsea tenant management organisation. the tmo was responsible for upkeep of the block, so fixing light bulbs, green spaces, and major renovation, including the renovation of grenfell tower. people have criticised the cladding on the outside of the building after that. they were ultimately responsible for that renovation. and now they have lost the contract? last month theresa may restrict it of response 30 for any work for any buildings around g re nfell tower. work for any buildings around grenfell tower. —— theresa may stripped it of responsibility for
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any work. it has been stripped of response 30 across the borough now. kim taylor—smith said the tmo no longer has the trust of residence and she cited lack of confidence in its fire safety record and a unanimous vote of no—confidence from the 25 resident associations across kensington and chelsea. so what next? we don't know! the council says it will consult residents about the future way of dealing with these issues. it is important for a number of reasons. we know the police are looking at possible criminal charges he against the council and the tmo over g re nfell tower. he against the council and the tmo over grenfell tower. this decision is not likely to directly influence that but it does tell you something about our residents and the council feel this organisation has been operating. thank you. quick comment from anthony about ryanair. we often go to the south of france but we are so fed up with the sausage machine thatis so fed up with the sausage machine that is rya nair, so fed up with the sausage machine that is ryanair, combined with seemingly overworked and unhappy staff, we now take the train. thank you for your comments.
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the charity unicef estimates that every half hour a child refugee is exploited by criminal gangs as they try to reach europe. it wants the government to allow children in war—torn countries to travel directly to the uk if they've lost contact with their parents back home and have family here they can be resettled with. in a moment we'll be hearing from a man who made the journey from afghanistan to the uk when he was 12. but firstjune kelly has spoken to a syrian man living in the uk, who is desperately trying to bring his 17—year—old brother over here to be with him. he's scared that if his brother is left in syria by himself he may be manipulated and recruited by the co—called islamic state group. that's a message from your brother. what's he saying to you? he's saying now i'm in aleppo and i'm trying to get hold of my certificate because i want to travel, i want to get out of syria.
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and just tell us about your brother. he's my youngest brother and he's 17 years old now. i'm trying to get him out of the town. what are the threats that your young brother is facing if he stays in syria? i think being a young person in syria, you are in danger of being recruited by the syrian government forces or the militants afilliated with the syrian government. on the other side, you've got different factions. you've got the radical group isis, or the islamic state, you know, they're recruiting a lot of young people. you've got other different opposition factions that are taking advantage and they're looking for young people to fight. in order to bring him to the uk, what would you have to do? well, i tried to look at the options and i've spoken to some people and the eu laws permit family
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reunion from other countries. so i really do not have a lot of options if my brother is still out of the eu borders. so i'm trying to find a way to get him somewhere within europe. what do you think about the fact that his best chance of getting to this country is by getting to europe first? what do you think of that system? i think this is a bit inhumane because in a country where half a million people are killed with millions and millions of family members scattered all over the world, you know, it's really tough, especially with young people. recently, in 2015—2016, there was a report which stated over 10,000 children are unaccompanied, you know, in europe. everyone's first choice,
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the legal safe route, everyone hopes to do this legally. but when the legal things, you know, the legal procedures do not work, you have other means because you want to save a life, you know. and here, you have to rely on illegal means like smugglers and human traffickers because you do not have an option. and these people take advantage of the law not permitting families to come. they step in and offer their services, because they see it as a service. but this is the only option you say because people are desperate? well, when you are in a desperate situation where the only thing you have is being recruited into, you know, an army, and getting involved in killing people or being recruited by radical groups involved in beheadings and all these terrible things, you do not have an option. it's a basic human right for a child to be with his family.
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and if he cannot stay with them in his country, at least he needs to stay with his brothers or sisters outside of that border. it's just a basic human right, you know. sadly, the system i think is failing and in the syrian case it's failing them miserably. if he stays in syria, do you fear for his life? i do fear for his life. and i do fearfor his everything because a couple of weeks ago i was speaking to him and he was like on his messenger, putting these pictures of arms and weapons. as a young person, he's exposed to the propaganda, you know. i think the propaganda in that country is so powerful that a lot of groups are trying to recruit people, so i'm afraid in five, ten years, i say five, but maybe one or two years,
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the innocent child will turn into a militant or a war criminal where he'll be killing dozens of people, beheading and looting because this is what the environment is telling him to do. this is why i want to get him out and to save him. one man talking about the concerns about his brother. gulwali passarlay left afghanistan at the age of 12 when his mother paid people smugglers $8,000 to take him and his brother to europe. lily caprani is the deputy executive director at unicef and is calling on the government to change the current rules to give child refugees more protection. tell us about your experience.” left afg ha nista n tell us about your experience.” left afghanistan at the age of 12
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and it took me a year to get to the uk through other countries. my family were faced with extraordinary circumstances, like many afghans, they wanted to get me out with my brother, but we were separated and i was in the hands of smugglers and i was in the hands of smugglers and i was in the hands of smugglers and i was in prison in almost every country that i travelled through. people say why didn't you stay in greece or turkey? a fair point but i was not welcomed. i was not treated asa was not welcomed. i was not treated as a child. forget that. i was not treated as a human unfortunately. the sad reality is it is not about me. it is about the millions of others risking their lives and making these journeys to safety. what is it that you want at unicef uk? this is a good example. he had an uncle living in the uk. for many of the children making these dangerous journeys from syria and afghanistan, dangerous places, there isa afghanistan, dangerous places, there is a safe place that they could be, with a family member. it may not be in the uk. it could be other parts of europe. but we think children are
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almost always better off with family members. the problem is there is no legal system for them to apply to that from syria or barack obama afghanistan. the only thing they can do is make these very dangerous journeys to europe, often trafficked and exploited along the way. the government said it would like to stop those journeys and so would weep but there needs to be a system. why don't we fix the uk rules and create a system whereby children who don't have a safe place to be that have a family member they could join the just make that application legally and then they wouldn't need to break the rules to get here? a lot of afghans in turkey, syria or jordan, it doesn't need to be this complicated. how many children do you think we might be talking about who have a relative here who you say what they would be safer being with? it is very hard to know an exact number but we aren't talking huge amounts, we are talking about a
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managed system. is that ten, one million, 10,000... managed system. is that ten, one million, 10,000. .. less managed system. is that ten, one million, 10,000... less than managed system. is that ten, one million, 10,000. .. less than 10,000. for example, in the last couple of yea rs we saw for example, in the last couple of years we saw that there were a number of children who made it to europe because they were trying to reach a family member in the uk, many were stuck in calais or other places around europe. 700 were eventually reunited with family members. those 700 shouldn't have to make that journey in the first place if the system work for them. it gives you an idea of the scale in the last year, and there were a numberof the last year, and there were a number of children who didn't make it, maybe they were killed, harmed, abused, exploited or have gone missing completely. it's protecting the vulnerable or stopping that happening, that is what we really want. there is a debate in this country around brexit, or even before the brexit vote. or about the numbers of people living in this country. and who we welcome into britain. some people say that actually britain is full, even for
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child refugees. i respectfully disagree. i have been travelling across britain campaigning and advocated, people have had well, they are willing to host refugees in their homes, particularly unaccompanied minors, we need to show compassion and solidarity with those people. i'm not saying that we should take everybody, we need to play ourfair share. we should take everybody, we need to play our fair share. we were supposed to take 3000 and we didn't. i'm not saying that we should welcome everyone but we should do our part with the rest of the eu and global community. britain is at its best when it is leading. we should best when it is leading. we should be leading in this crisis. we cannot wash our hands of responsibility. with intervention in iraq and syria, other places, we need to ensure that we help those who need protection and safety, especially those who are most vulnerable. 10,000 went missing last year. where are they? are they safe ? last year. where are they? are they safe? we don't know. if britain could find a way to work with the rest of the eu, those children
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wouldn't have two experience what i've experienced and what millions of others experience across the world. what was the worst thing you experienced over those 12 months? the whole journey was going through hell, but the boat capsizing after 48 hours, i saw death with my own eyes. i see people dying and drowning in the mediterranean and it keeps me awake at night. how as a civilised world do we let those people down? there are people willing to show solidarity and help and support, but there is a government who lacks a humane response to it. the government has to do better, basically come out and rather than build fences, it needs to give people a second chance. i wouldn't be where i am without the help and support of the uk, i'm so grateful to stay here but it was a struggle. it took me five years to be accepted as a refugee, i recently
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graduated from the university of manchester and i've done all sorts of things because i was given the chance to be here. i would love for other people in my situation to have a similar opportunity. they are human beings. did you and do the right thing when she paid people smugglers $8,000 to get you and your brother to europe? i haven't seen her in11 years, brother to europe? i haven't seen her in 11 years, she sent me but she also lost me. i wish i could stay, when it becomes safe and secure i can go back. a lot of refugees want to go back using their experience and education to rebuild it. my mother, in her situation, any mother watching, it would be difficult to send your teenage sons away, but they were faced with such circumstances that they did not have a choice, other then to hope that they would be welcomed and treated fairly and justly. thank you to both of you. a home office spokesperson said: "the uk has a long and proud
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tradition of providing protection to those who need it and in the last year alone we have provided refuge or other forms of leave to more than 9,000 children. approximately half of the 8,500 syrians resettled in the uk so far are children — part of our commitment to resettling 20,000 people affected by the syrian conflict by 2020. we have also committed to resettling up to 3,000 children and their families from the middle east and north africa. let me read you the these messages, these are from you watching our conversation and what we started the programme with, about sexual harassment for mostly young people ona harassment for mostly young people on a night out. and the fact that, for some people, it is the norm which is pretty depressing. julia said that when she was 17 a man came up said that when she was 17 a man came up from behind and put his hand up my skirt at waterloo station. i had a rolled up umbrella in my hand and i wrapped it around his neck. he tried to run away but he was caught
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and the police were called. it went to court, where my mangled umbrella was produced as evidence and he was found guilty. gill says it is nothing new and has gone on for yea rs. nothing new and has gone on for years. when i used to go clubbing men would rub up against the back of men would rub up against the back of me on the dance floor, i was touched onjeeps, this is across europe. not only in this country. most children and young people are only too aware of terror attacks in manchester, but it's unlikely that they would know what to do if it happened to them. police want their run, hide and tell advice to be rolled out in schools and for pa rents to rolled out in schools and for parents to stress to children that they should not stay and film what they should not stay and film what they see on their phones. this is they see on their phones. this is the video police have produced to get the message across. i've climbed to the summit of everest.
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i've tackled some big units. i've brought down the all blacks. i've trained in tae kwon do for 16 years. i've been in the paras, the royal marines and the special forces. i've started from the bottom and fought my way to the top. do you know what i would do in a knife or gun terror attack? i would run... hide... tell. right now, terrorism is a real threat. and even though attacks are rare... there are things you can do to stay safe. remember... run... the deputy assistant commissioner of the metropolitan police said that the metropolitan police said that the aim of the campaign was to give young people but also they can help themselves and others to safety. their safety is paramount, in the unlikely event that they are caught up unlikely event that they are caught up in the middle of a terror attack, especially one involving knives and guns. that has to be a priority, rather than staying around to use their phones to film it. immediately people will be thinking, this does not only apply to children to be honest but this is geared towards
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them, that you in your police work find that information that is gleaned from this image is very useful sometimes. some people may have that in mind while something is occurring? yes, of course, i understand that. where there is footage out there it is always useful for footage out there it is always usefulfor an footage out there it is always useful for an investigation but footage out there it is always usefulfor an investigation but my message is that young people, adults, anybody really. your safety needs to come first. when i discussed this with my family, that's the message i always say. ensure that you are safe and look at your options. we say to people to make sure that you run, hide and tell somebody. lucy dorsey from the metropolitan police. the war of words between facebook founder mark zuckerberg and donald trump has been hotting up this morning, after the us president said the social network has always been against him. it started when mr trump declared on twitter: facebook was always anti trump. the networks were always anti—trump hence, fake news. but zuckerberg fired back in this
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statement on facebook: "trump says facebook is against him. liberals say we helped trump. both sides are upset about ideas and content they don't like. that's what running a platform for all ideas looks like." mr zuckerberg's response attracted 65,000 likes within two hours of being posted. he also said he regretted denying the role played by facebook, in spreading what he calls "misinformation", orfake news , during the us presidential election. apparent bias in the media isn't something donald trump has been quiet about in the past, in fact it's been a common theme since he began his run for the presidency. if you want to discover the source of division in our country, look no further than the fake news and the crooked media. which would rather
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get ratings and clicks than tell the truth. i want you all to know that we are fighting the fake news. it is fake, phoney, fake! you are fake news, go ahead. can you state categorically... it is all fake news, it is phoney stuff. it did not happen. bbc news, that's another beauty... as far as buzzfeed, which isa beauty... as far as buzzfeed, which is a failing pilot got —— pile of garbage. as you know, i have a running war with the media, they are among the most dishonest human beings on earth. joining me now via webcam is prashant rao from the new york times... another beauty as well! thank you for coming onto the programme. what do you think of this row between trump and mark zuckerberg? in one way, it is in keeping with the president, taking aim at what you call the mainstream media, the new york times and the bbc. major american tv news outlets, buzzfeed,
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new media, he has been describing them in that way but facebook is something that he has not directly done, it is unusual to target facebook in this way. what is the role of social media? in politics, globally, in 2017? ithink role of social media? in politics, globally, in 2017? i think that facebook, you read out mark zuckerberg's statement. it is very clear, after the us presidential election, they say they did not have a role in that election result. over time, they increasingly tried to be a little more... activist about the way they understand how they influence politics. so we can see now that, you know, facebook recently announced it was hiring 3000 new moderators for content on its platform. 3000 are bigger than
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the vast majority of newsrooms. the fa ct the vast majority of newsrooms. the fact it has a massive role to play in media in the news. is facebook biased against donald trump? you can ask people across the united states, they would say that there is a degree of bias, facebook in may 2016 had to fire one team because they we re had to fire one team because they were accused of suppressing right—wing topics. regarding the algorithm, facebook would like to say it is much more automated. to the user, facebook is how it presents it. i think the question of bias is one thing but the secondary question is how does facebook combat the buyers? -- bias? what is the a nswer to the buyers? -- bias? what is the answer to that, briefly? it is incredibly difficult. the election isa incredibly difficult. the election is a great example. we can summarise its efforts in that regard. things
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like offering people who click on political articles in germany, a secondary click to election party ma nifestos. secondary click to election party manifestos. of all the political parties, so that they can be better informed. to offer up different political content. i'm going to pause you there, thank you. thank you for watching, back tomorrow. in the west, as the rain clears, sunny spells developing and risk of some showers in northern and western areas. maximum temperatures from 17 to 20 but fresher in the north west. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11.
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the prime minister mounts a strong defence of the free market — a day afterjeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a "crisis of legitimacy". a free—market economy operating under the right roles and regulations is the greatest agent of collective human progress ever created. the fourth round of the brexit negotiations draws to a close in brussels today — with accusations of not enough progress being made. ryanair is breaking the law in its handling of flight cancellations — according to the boss of the uk's aviation regulator. also, could ben stokes's hopes of touring australia this winter have turned to ashes?
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